RSS Bandit on .NET Framework 2.0

It’s disappointing to see Dare say that RSS Bandit would stay as a .NET Framework 1.1 application for at least a year, maybe two.

Why do I want RSS Bandit to be a .NET 2.0 application? I’m not exactly sure.

It’s probably similar to the reason that people wanted Win32 apps when Windows 95 was released, rather than the 16 bit Windows apps that they already had that worked fine (and most of which still work fine today). New is better, right? Isn’t the new framework faster, more stable, and just better?

Adoption of the framework is a chicken / egg scenario. Developers don’t want to require their users go download a huge platform update just to get an update to their application.

But maybe part of it is I’d just like everyone to move to 2.0 so we can let 1.1 pass away. I don’t want to have 1.0, 1.1, 2.0, 2.1, 2.2, 3.0, and 3.1 all on my system 5 years from now. At 60 meg each (that’s about the size of the 1.1 and 2.0 runtimes, installed), that’s 540 meg of .NET Framework. Not only that, but if I’m running applications that are using a mix of the framework versions, then I’ve got the runtime in memory numerous times. If all the apps are using the current version, then only the current version of the runtime is loaded.

Microsoft promised that DLL Hell would go away, but with the .NET Framework betas, they dropped us into the biggest DLL Hell I’ve ever seen. I can’t uninstall MSH from my system because I installed the .NET Framework 2.0, which required that I uninstall the beta versions. The MSH uninstaller requires the beta framework, which I uninstalled, so I’m stuck. I can’t install the release version of MSH. This sort of thing is just silly, and I thought it was a problem that we’d solved. (To be fair, they did promise that this won’t be a problem for release versions of the framework, but how many millions of times were the betas downloaded?)